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Improve Patient Outcomes: The Missing Puzzle Piece

Free instant download: Clinical Justification: Resolution and/or Significant Reduction of Chronic Medical Conditions Can be Achieved by Successfully Treating Overweight and Obese Patients.

Improve patient outcomes with those that are battling obesity. Obesity is the fastest growing health problem in the United States. It’s also proving to be among the most deadly. It kills more Americans every year than AIDS, cancer and all accidents combined. It is the second leading cause of preventable death just below smoking. In fact, 67 percent of the population that are either overweight or obese have a greater probability of developing hypertension, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. This translates to over 300,000 deaths per year from obesity related complications.1

While the health costs of obesity are taking an enormous toll on population health, it remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. According to the American Medical Association, only 42 percent of adult obesity patients reported receiving any prior advice from a physician to lose weight.2 This is a problem. Obesity is not only a chronic disease that affects over 35 percent of adults in the U.S., but it is often the root cause or associated with over 59 comorbidities.

Consider some of these statistics:

  1. OBESITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH POOR ASTHMA
    • Asthma is 1.47 times higher in obese people than non-obese people.
    • American College of Chest Physicians supports the active treatment of comorbid obesity in individuals with asthma.
  2. HYPERTENSION AFFECTS NEARLY ONE THIRD OF THE AMERICAN POPULATION.
    • There is a higher prevalence of hypertension among individuals with obesity.
    • As a result of weight loss from a Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD), patients often experience about a 10 percent decreased risk of heart disease, stroke, a-fib and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) while on a VLCD.
  3. OBESITY IS A MAJOR RISK FACTOR FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES
    • More than 90 percent of type 2 diabetics are overweight or obese.
    • Studies show weight loss improves glucose control, as well as blood pressure and cholesterol, contributing to reduced medications and higher quality of life.
  4. AN OBESE PERSON HAS A 60 PERCENT GREATER RISK OF DEVELOPING ARTHRITIS.
    • One in five Americans has been diagnosed with arthritis, but that number jumps to more than one in three among people with obesity.
    • Total knee arthroplasty is estimated to be at least 8.5 times higher among patients with a BMI of 30 or greater.
    • A study of overweight women showed that a weight loss of 11 pounds reduced their risk of developing knee osteoarthritis by half
  5. OBESITY SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASES THE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE.
    • The incidence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), stroke, Atrial Fibrillation (AF), and Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) increases with increasing BMI.
    • Weight loss reduces blood pressure, improves insulin sensitivity and lipids – all of which have an important benefit on cardiovascular risk.

To learn more about these and more comorbid conditions and their relationship to obesity, click here for our free download: Clinical Justification: Resolution and/or Significant Reduction of Chronic Medical Conditions Can be Achieved by Successfully Treating Overweight and Obese Patients.

Free instant download: Clinical Justification: Resolution and/or Significant Reduction of Chronic Medical Conditions Can be Achieved by Successfully Treating Overweight and Obese Patients.

Sources:

  1. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Executive summary. National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, June 1998.
  2. Pool, A. C., Kraschnewski, J. L., Cover, L. A., Lehman, E. B., Stuckey, H. L., Hwang, K. O., … Sciamanna, C. N. (2014). The Impact of Physician Weight Discussion on Weight Loss in US Adults.Obesity Research & Clinical Practice8(2), e131–e139. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2013.03.003)
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