RobardUser Robard Corporation | Habits

Is Fast Food Making Your Patients Overweight?



These days, everything needs to be fast. We need fast internet, fast traffic, fast DMV lines. Fast is almost always better, right? The keyword is almost. Fast seems great on a surface level but when it comes to fast food, the tradeoff is fast weight gain.

According to a 15-year study of 3,000 adults, people who visited fast food restaurants more than twice per week gained roughly nine to 11 pounds more than people who visited them less than once per week. And if you’re patients are grabbing fast foods more than twice per week, there’s the potential that they will put on a lot of extra pounds.

There are a wide variety of fast food options, but they all tend to have something in common: Most fast food ingredients contain more energy, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates and added sugars than healthier food of the same weight. As a result of these less healthy ingredients, eating fast food has been found to be directly associated with both being overweight and exceeding the recommended levels of fat and sugar

Fast food also tends to be loaded with empty calories. As we discussed in our blog article, Why Weight Loss is not as Simple as Cutting Calories, health care professionals cannot just discuss limiting calories with their patients. They also need to discuss the nutritional value present in the foods their calories are coming from.

Unlike healthier food items, most fast foods contain substantially fewer vitamins and minerals, and tend to be filled with carbs and sugars devoid of any real nutritional value. Conversely, healthier foods that contain more vitamins and minerals, like fruits and veggies, can help people feel satiated longer and reduce daily calorie intake.

Convenience is a huge reason that many Americans opt for fast food. But physicians can support patients in making healthier food choices while still not sacrificing convenience, satiety, or even taste. Robard’s meal replacement products are scientifically designed for optimal nutrition, provide all the vitamins and minerals necessary for healthy weight loss, while decreasing caloric intake. Plus, with easy, convenient options like ready to drink shakes and bars, patients can still grab and go without settling for empty, non-nutritious fast foods.

Curious about how using meal replacements can help your patients make better food choices while losing weight? Check out our free, on-demand video Meal Replacements for Short and Long Term Success and learn how meal replacements can benefit your patients at any stage of their journey! Then contact us for some free samples so you can taste them yourself!

Source: Bariatric Surgery Source


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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Fat Acceptance: Can you be Content and Happy in your Own Skin?



I’ve struggled with weight all of my adult life. At times, I was sickly thin. Other times, I was bloated and uncomfortable in my own skin. Both experiences have given me a perspective on what it’s like to be overweight and underweight.

At my heaviest, I easily clear 260 pounds — I am close to that weight now. I am a 6’1” man, so my belly tends to enter a room before I do. At my thinnest, I was 160 pounds. At that weight I tended to look like I had a terminal disease. During my “lean years,” I could not lose enough weight. I felt horrible about myself when I was overweight, and felt embarrassed around other people. I still battle that internal voice.

I recently read a terrific article by Caroline J. Cederquist, M.D., in which she asked, “How can a man or a woman be accepting of their body when it falls so far outside of society’s vision of the ideal form?” I suppose that many of us who wrestle with our weight face that same question. Cederquist, who is a board-certified bariatric physician, insists that, “it is those who accept their weight and deal with it powerfully who achieve the most profound and lasting weight loss results.” So what does she recommend? Change your internal conversation. Here’s her advice:

1. Begin with the belief that you are far more as an individual than just your weight.
“Shift your internal conversation from one of shame and self-loathing to one of power and possibility begins with the belief that you are far more than just your weight.”

2. Answer the following questions: Who you are presently? Who you will become when you have powerfully dealt with your weight?
“Think of more than just weight loss, but of how you live your life. Maybe today you are ‘limited by your mobility’ but are creating a future of ‘activity and mobility.’ With this example, what does it look like when you are able to do the things that your lack of mobility has prevented? What new possibilities exist for you, and how is your experience of life different?”

3. Think of the action steps you will take to make the future you have envisioned for yourself a reality.
“Outline each step that you will take in becoming a lighter, healthier you. An action step is not, a statement such as ‘lose weight.’ An action step is a specific action that you will take in order to reach your desired outcome.”

For me, the takeaway from Cederquist’s advice was that perspective is everything. It’s akin to the pseudoscientific law of attraction: What you focus on and think about internally is what you’re likely to invite in life. True or not, I subscribe to that theory. Perhaps the first step to lasting weight loss is solely mental. Try envisioning a healthier, happier you for a day or two and see if your perspective changes. Remember, you can always lose weight. But you should never lose yourself to guilt or shame.

About Robard: Robard, a privately-owned, family-oriented company headquartered in central New Jersey, has been a respected leader in the weight loss and management business for more than 40 years. In that time, we have helped tens of thousands of physicians, hospitals, and medical professionals treat countless patients annually, ranging from mildly overweight to severely obese with related chronic conditions. To learn more, visit us online.


Source: Huffington Post

Blog written by Kevin Boyce/Robard Corporation


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5 Tips to Keep Patients Motivated When They’re Not Losing Weight



Losing weight is easy — said no one ever! Patients sometimes approach weight loss with unrealistic expectations. Some think that if they just exercise and eat better, the weight will melt off and they’ll drop 20 pounds in a couple weeks. However, the reality is that people can work really hard, be super committed to their diet and exercise plan, and yet still not see the kind of progress they hope for as quickly as they want to see it. On top of the fact that in this time of the year, patients may also be dealing with winter weight gain that has thrown off their previous progress. So is it time to throw in the towel?

No way. Health care providers can play the role of reminding your patients that the journey of weight loss is a process, filled with ups and downs. A lot of factors may contribute to weight not coming off quickly; but providers and patients can work together to figure it out. In the meantime, it’s important to have some tools that you can provide patients to keep them in the game mentally so that they maintain the motivation to keep going, despite slow or even backwards progress.

Take a look at our slideshow of five tips (below) that will help dieters stay motivated to keep trying, even if they aren’t losing weight. If weight loss is not your specialty, take a look at our clinically designed Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD), where dieters can lose 3-5 pounds a week on average. Our programs are easy to implement using your existing staff, and we provide all the training and support necessary to get you started. Contact us for more information here.

And for those already offering weight loss services at your practice, don’t forget that Robard has a wealth of resources to help keep your patients motivated. If you haven’t already, download our 10 Weight Loss Affirmations to Motivate and Retain Patients for free now!


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


Editor’s Note: This blog was originally published in February 2017 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

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