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Sweeteners: The Inside Scoop



In an effort to better our diets, we often look for healthier choices — especially when it comes to sugar alternatives. Instead of sugar, a large number of shoppers reach for low calorie artificial sweeteners, believing that doing so will offer a similar taste without the guilt and adverse health effects. According to preliminary research, however, artificial sweeteners can do more harm than good. Study results recently presented at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society’s 99th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, showed that low calorie, artificial sweeteners could be detrimental to the body’s metabolism.

Results showed that “large consumption of these sugar substitutes could promote fat accumulation, especially in people who are already obese.” Researchers found that there was an increase in glucose transport into cell and overexpression of fat-producing genes, as well as an overexpression of sweet taste receptors in fat tissue.

“We believe that low calorie sweeteners promote additional fat formation by allowing more glucose to enter the cells, and promotes inflammation, which may be more detrimental in obese individuals,” says Sabyasachi Sen, MD, an Associate Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and the study’s principal investigator.

Researchers believe that the findings signify metabolic dysregulation causing cellular mechanisms to make more fat. The effects were most apparent in “obese individuals who consumed low-calorie sweeteners, rather than individuals of normal weight.”

So how do we educate ourselves more about these sweeteners and how it affects obese and overweight patients? For starters, join us on Wednesday, June 14 at 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) for a complementary webcast featuring Registered Dietitian Laurie Shank entitled, How Sweet it is:  Navigating the World of Natural and Artificial Sweeteners. During the webcast, Laurie will discuss commonly used types of natural, caloric sweeteners in the U.S. food supply, as well as the types of artificial, non-nutritive sweeteners approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. while identifying the health risks and benefits of caloric and non-caloric sweetening agents as they relate to health and weight management.

If you want to learn more about artificial sweeteners and the effects on the body this is a presentation you don’t want to miss! To register and find out more, click here.

Source: Endocrine Society


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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3 Facts About Food Addiction




As the obesity epidemic continues to grow, more and more physicians are considering treatment. Obesity is recognized as a chronic disease by the American Medical Association, and even binge eating, which can lead to obesity, has been officially classified as an eating disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V).

As doctors work to find more effective ways to treat obesity, the underlying causes of weight gain are also being considered. While societal factors and lack of education on exercise and dieting certainly play a role, physicians should also consider even deeper causes of excessive weight in the individual, including food addiction.

Recent studies have begun to show that the pattern of weight loss and regain, combined with the inability to control eating habits, clinically presents like an addiction. The clinical presentation and symptom profile between substance abuse and food addiction is
well documented.

To learn a little more about food addiction, take a look at this infographic and download our free white paper on food addiction by clicking here.


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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Three Important Things to Remember When Dealing with Excess Skin After Weight Loss



In the beginning of their weight loss journeys, many dieters think they’ll lose 40 pounds and look like Cindy Crawford. They fantasize about hitting the beach in the smallest bikini they can find to show off their new body and celebrate all of their hard work. One thing that dieters are sometimes unprepared for, however, is that they still may need to deal with some body image issues after weight loss. One such issue is excess skin.

Dieters who lose significant weight often deal with loose, sagging skin — a remnant of what their bodies used to look like. This happens because while your fat cells shrink when the weight is lost, you still retain the same surface area. The new void under the larger surface area creates a layer of skin that may “hang” because there is less tissue underneath taking up space.

In addition to the detrimental mental and psychological effects this may cause — shame, embarrassment, depression, and anger — excess skin can also put some people at risk for rashes, infections and even immobility. For some patients, once the weight is lost, the journey is not over — but that does not mean the goal is unobtainable.

For many formerly obese and overweight people, learning to love one’s body remains a lifelong pursuit with many challenges along the way. If you are currently dealing with the challenge of excess skin, it is important to remember these three things:

1. YOU DID IT! You lost the weight. You accomplished your goal. Don’t forget that you achieved tremendous success and did something that so many people struggle to realize. In addition to being at a healthy weight, you have most likely also decreased your risk for comorbid conditions that threaten your ability to live a long, healthy life. Celebrate yourself and all that you’ve accomplished, and don’t let this challenge overshadow what you have overcome!

2. Do your research. Just like you didn’t have to settle for being overweight, you don’t have to settle for excess skin that causes you physical and emotional discomfort. There are many resources available to help you work to minimize or get rid of excess skin, from weight training programs to help you build muscle mass and tighten the skin, to more involved solutions like cosmetic surgery. Speak to your healthcare provider about what he/she might suggest.

3. Focus on maintenance. Losing weight was hard; but for many, keeping the weight off can be just as difficult. Many dieters find themselves on a weight loss roller coaster, constantly losing weight and gaining it back. Don’t let the excess skin sidetrack you from maintaining your well-deserved progress. If you need help, find a provider who has a maintenance program which can provide a structure to make it easier for you to keep the weight off, such as Robard’s S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan.

For providers who want to help their formerly obese and overweight patients maintain weight loss, the S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan is one of many complimentary programs and services available to Robard customers. Learn more about how to start a program at your center.


Source: U.S. News & World Report

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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