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The Other Obesity-Related Disorder Physicians Should Be Talking About – And It’s Not Diabetes… (Free White Paper)




Overweight and obesity have long been associated with over 30 different chronic comorbid conditions. But some of these conditions are more readily talked about with providers than others. The impact of weight on Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension is pretty clear to both patients and physicians alike. 

But did you know that Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease affects one-third of American adults and is expected to be the most common reason for liver transplantation?

Fatty liver occurs when too much fat is stored in the liver cells. Over time, this extra fat can lead to inflammation and scarring, or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and putting the patient at highest risk for liver cirrhosis necessitating liver transplant.

The insidious thing about fatty liver is that it generally does not present any symptoms, so it is a condition that can go undiagnosed.  However, it is most often suspected when the liver enzymes are elevated on routine blood testing, but is generally definitely confirmed through liver biopsy.

What causes fatty liver isn’t definitely known, but is clearly associated with being overweight or obese. According to the Mayo Clinic, NAFLD affects an estimated 80 million to 100 million Americans, and 90 percent of the patients diagnosed with NASH (and are at high risk for cirrhosis) are either overweight or obese.

Because of the asymptomatic nature of fatty liver disease, physicians may be unknowingly taking preemptive measures to diagnose the disorder when they choose to address their patients’ weight through a medically supervised weight loss program. Robard’s program, for example, involves physician-reviewed medical protocols that require the patient to undergo ongoing medical supervision and blood work that can be helpful in identifying underlying conditions such as fatty liver. And even more good news – one of the most effective and least invasive methods of treating the disease has been found to be weight loss. So participation in a weight management program can help physicians simultaneously diagnose AND treat the disease. How’s that for efficiency?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of deaths from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis has risen every year since 2007, and with obesity also on the rise, we can count on those deaths to steadily increase -- unless physicians take a proactive approach.

"Weight loss works, whether through a bariatric procedure or a strict dietary approach," says Dr. Jay Horton, director, Center for Human Nutrition at UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Even an eight percent to 10 percent weight loss seems to improve liver fat.”

If you are interested in learning more about fatty liver and the most efficient way to diagnose and treat it, download our free white paper, Liver Enzyme Abnormalities, by Dr. John D. Hernried of The Hernried Center for Medical Weight Loss. Then contact us to find out more about how we can help you get a program started that can help you provide the solutions your patients need to live healthier lives!

Sources: US News, CNBC

Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Study: Providers Cite Lack of Knowledge as a Major Barrier to Treating Patients with Obesity



By now, the need to prioritize obesity treatment in health care is widely accepted. Not a single state met the 2010 Healthy People goal of a 15% obesity rate. Instead, obesity rates have steadily climbed, with over one-third of American adults being obese, and with the United States ranking as one of the most obese countries in the world. And with obesity rates rising, so do the rates of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

With obesity officially having been classified as a disease in 2013 by the American Medical Association, more providers understand the links between obesity and other chronic conditions, as well as the importance of obesity treatment. But a recent study from George Washington University shows that this transition to prioritizing obesity treatment is not an easy one because most providers lack knowledge and understanding of recommended obesity treatments, such as behavioral counseling and pharmacotherapy.

In an accompanying editorial published in Obesity, Robert Kushner, MD, FTOS, examines the impact of this study. He concluded that, “The study suggests that more obesity education is needed among primary health care providers that focuses on knowledge along with enhanced competencies in patient care management, communication, and behavior change.”
 
Staying up-to-date with new information and best practices can be extremely difficult for a busy health care provider while the demands of the business and the patients remain high. But finding partners who can do some of the heavy lifting for you can support you in not only getting the necessary knowledge, but also streamlining your practices and provide you and your staff with the essential training and tools to implement this important service that will help your patients get healthier quicker, while saving your practice time and money.w

We encourage you to take advantage of free resources, like Robard’s three-part webcast series on How to Speak to Patients about Obesity, which can walk you through step-by-step on how to get this conversation started with patients.

If you understand how imperative it is to start addressing weight loss in your patients, but just aren’t sure how to get started, reach out to Robard today!

Source: Science Daily


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Three Important Tips to Help Patients Deal with Excess Skin after Weight Loss



In the beginning of a weight loss journey, many patients think they’ll lose 40 pounds and look like Cindy Crawford. They fantasize about hitting the beach in the smallest bikini they can find to show off their new body and celebrate all of their hard work. One thing that weight loss patients are sometimes unprepared for, however, is that they still may need to deal with some body image issues after weight loss. One such issue is excess skin.

Dieters who lose significant weight often deal with loose, sagging skin — a remnant of what their bodies used to look like. This happens because even though fat cells shrink when the weight is lost, the body still retains the same surface area. The new void under the larger surface area creates a layer of skin that may “hang” because there is less tissue underneath taking up space.

In addition to the detrimental mental and psychological effects this may cause — shame, embarrassment, depression and/or anger — excess skin can also put some people at risk for rashes, infections and even immobility. For some patients, once the weight is lost, the journey is not over — but that does not mean the goal is unobtainable.

For many formerly obese and overweight people, learning to love one’s body remains a lifelong pursuit with many challenges along the way. If you have patients currently dealing with the challenge of excess skin, here are three things you can say and do for them that can help motivate them to continue on in the journey:

1. “YOU DID IT!” Remind your patients of how far they have come, how much weight they have lost, and how many goals they have achieved. Remind them that they achieved tremendous success and did something that so many people struggle to do. In addition to being at a healthy weight, they have most likely also decreased their risk for comorbid conditions that threaten their ability to live a long, healthy life. Celebrate with them, and don’t let this challenge overshadow what they have overcome!
2. Provide referrals. Know what resources (both medical and cosmetic) are out there to help patients deal with issues like excess skin. There are many resources available to help your patients work to minimize or get rid of excess skin, from weight training programs to help build muscle mass and tighten the skin, to more involved solutions like cosmetic surgery. Have a resource list of your area available. If you need help developing one, contact us about how some of our complimentary business support services might be able to support.
3. Focus on maintenance. Losing weight was hard; but for many, keeping the weight off can be just as difficult. Many dieters find themselves on a weight loss roller coaster, constantly losing weight and gaining it back. Don’t let the excess skin sidetrack your patients from maintaining their well-deserved progress. Having a maintenance program is essential to your patients’ continued weight loss success in the long-term. Download our exclusive, free staff training kit, “Added Value Maintenance,” that walks your staff through some key elements of the Maintenance Phase of weight loss.

For providers who want to help their formerly obese and overweight patients maintain weight loss, the S.T.A.R. Maintenance Plan is one of many complimentary programs and services available to Robard customers. Learn more about how to start a program at your center.


Editor’s Note: This blog was originally published in March 2017 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.


Source: U.S. News & World Report


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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